Of Oases, History, and Patriotism

On this occasion, our adventure away from our home at Land’s End on the southernmost area of Baja California Sur took us more than 370 miles north, on a journey of almost 8 and a half hours to Heroica Mulegé. Something you should know is that, if you want to follow the modern traveler trend, Baja California Sur is a great option for a Road Trip experience, with the crew of your choice, to get to know the treasures of this land.

Its ever-changing landscapes and the mixture of contrasting colors on the horizon will make you savor each stretch of highway in a way that will make want to repeat the road trip over and over again.

Our delights began with a look at “El Requeson”, at Bahía Concepción. This white sand beach is like a large pool of crystal-clear water, perfect for connecting with nature. A fascinating characteristic of this place is the sand pathway that leads you to a small island, as well as the breathtaking beauty of countless twinkling stars that fill the sky when night falls.

As the road trip continued with stunningly beautiful beach landscapes, estuaries, mountains and ravines with cacti, palm and date trees, we entered the heart of Heroica Mulegé.

Heroica Mulegé

The Jesuit priest Juan María de Salvatierra y Vizconti, founding father of the missions of Upper and Lower California, arrived around 1701 to this area, which the Cochimí natives called “Barranca Grande de la Boca Blanca”, giving rise to the founding of the third mission of Las Californias in 1705 by Father Juan María Basaldúa; who had to leave the peninsula due to illness, being replaced by Francisco María Piccolo. It is estimated that the construction of the Church of Santa Rosalía de Mulegé, which stands today as a legacy of missionary architecture, was completed approximately in 1766.

A daring event was written in the local history in 1847, when the troops of General Manuel Pineda Muñoz fiercely defended the Baja California territory from US invasion. This event is commemorated every October 2, when all three branches of the State government move to Heroica Mulegé, which becomes the State capital for a day.

Touring the entrails of this community will take you on a special journey of a territory full of cultural heritage and Baja Californian pride. The friendly character of the people of Mulegé has been forged by the noble atmosphere of this generous land and it was confirmed in every place we visited.

Historic Center

Upon arrival it was very easy to start a conversation with the people in the town square, they enthusiastically shared information about the places we should visit, so the route we planned before leaving Los Cabos was forgotten when we listened to the advice of those who became our guides. We realized then that spontaneity would be the quality that would lead the itinerary.

Corona Garden

It is the main square and is surrounded by old adobe houses. One of these old houses is the post office, which is still in service, and the home of the popular local poet and historian, Homero Yee Lizardi. There are also houses of other important members of the local community, such as historian José Alán Gorosave, and the Higuera teachers, all of them characters loved by the community.

Historical Buildings

The Municipal Delegation is located, where the Professor Braulio Rodríguez School used to be, and the Hacienda Hotel is where the old telegraph offices were. Both buildings are more than a century old and full of stories.

The Viewing Point (Mirador)

It is located behind the church of Santa Rosalía de Mulegé and from here you can see the “Carmaañc Galexa” Oasis, a source of life for the natives and an important reason that gave rise to the Mulegé mission. The energy that emanates from this place has prevailed over time as an inspiration for those who give themselves the opportunity to contemplate its landscape. It is moving to imagine the impact it had on the explorers who were there, long before us, and who found this oasis of life in the middle of the desert.

Historic Museum

This space served as a jail. It was called “prison without doors” because, even though it housed the prisoners of the territory, those who showed good behavior could go out to work for the day, without the need of guards. Prisoners returned at nightfall to the jail – built during the Porfiriato – without trying to escape, due to the possibility of succumbing to the hostile environment of the burning desert around it. Currently, it exhibits some elements donated by the community such as instruments used by the native population in their daily lives and even the remains of a satellite.

Concepción Bay

This paradisiacal landscape is considered one of the most beautiful in Mexico due to its dynamic contrast of sea, rock formations, desert, mountains, and valleys that are home to a vast wealth of flora and fauna. Santispac, one of the most popular beaches, can be your starting point for other beaches such as: Concepción, El Burro, El Coyote, Los Cocos, Buenaventura or El Requesón. Also, to the crossing through the islands such as: San Ramón, La Pitahaya, La Cueva, Isla Blanca and El Faro.

The ecosystem is made up of mangroves and animals such as hares, coyotes, raccoons, ospreys, cormorants, blue-footed booby birds, seagulls and pelicans, as well as colorful fish, queen trigger fish, puffer fish, rooster fish and snapper.

Camping is the favorite plan for those who visit this place, remember to bring equipment for snorkeling, kayaking and other aquatic activities.

Travelers agree that enjoying the starry sky is the perfect way to end your day in this bay.

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