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Pearl Fishing in La Paz

A bad day of fishing is better than a good day of work. For those who enjoy waking up early, watching the sun coming up over the horizon and feeling the sea breeze, a day of fishing is more than a job. It is a true delight and a pleasure.

The municipalities of Baja California Sur are home to several points historically relevant for fishing, whether for commercial, sport, or personal consumption.

“Beginning in the early 1900’s, there are stories about commercial fishing around Espiritu Santo. The fishermen of the Esterito continue working near the island. The history of the area has been passed down by their parents, grandparents and great-grandparents. More than four generations of fishermen have worked, and continue to work, the sea. You can still find fishermen who have been here since the 1940s, as well young people who have just begun to follow their relatives working the sea.

During the first half of the 20th century, fishing was focused on pearls, shark and large fish such as grouper.

“My tata went in a canoe with two brothers to work in Los Lupones. When they landed, they found a thin, mother of pearl shell. My dad says my uncle picked it up. He threw it down and they sat to eat. When finished, my dad went to pick up the shell that had been left on the beach. He opened it and said there was a fat pearl inside. He said to his brother: “Let’s go to La Paz” – “Why?” – “Let’s go!” – “What’s the problem?” – “Here is the problem. God has already blessed us. We must return!”

They sold the pearl and did very well. My tata settled here and bought another canoe. They made some fine equipment and bought a good house with just one pearl.” Jose Antonio Mendez Castro

On every point of the archipelago, you can see the traces left by the fishermen. They can be found in the moorings, camps, caves and at the bottom of the sea.

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