San Borjitas: ancestral legacy and a journey through time

The Sierra de Guadalupe, in the municipality of Mulegé, will become a portal that will take your imagination to the Neolithic era, 8,500 years ago, the entrance is San Borjitas, a cave where the Cochimí ethnic group left the mark of a society that managed the fierce territory and found refuge in this mountainous area.

The remnants of their lifestyle were recorded in the cave art that colors the entrance of this cave since prehistory; elongated figures in maroon and black tones make up the oldest cave paintings in the American continent.

Gazing at this prehistoric expression of life makes you lose track of time as you try to decipher the discourse behind those men pierced by arrows, foraging women, and priests with curious ornaments on their square heads. Some endemic animals are also depicted on this rocky canvas that represents the customs of the first settlers of Baja California Sur.

How to get there

The closest entrance to the Cueva de San Borjitas is in Palo Verde, a sub-delegation of Mulegé. To enter, contact a local guide to guide you through the access procedures. You will then drive for about an hour and a half along a winding dirt road.

During our visit, José Evelardo Villavicencio guided us through the mountains, through the brush, mesquite, zalates, and wild fig trees, and other endemic plants in our adventure witnessed by frogs, birds and insects that inhabit this oasis in the middle of the desert.

Travel tips

For the road:

  • All-terrain vehicle

For the trail:

  • Hiking poles
  • Backpack with snacks or light lunch
  • Water
  • Biodegradable sunscreen
  • Hat or accessories to protect you from the sun
  • Comfortable hiking shoes

Leave a Reply